Winter Park Resort Shuttle Buses

The whole Middle Park region is served by these gray-and-blue buses

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So, you may have gathered by now that I’m a committed model railroader.  I have a layout that takes my half of the garage (my wife parks her car in her half, something I actually understand on cold mornings when I must scrape frost off my windshield).  The setting is the rail line between Denver and Winter Park.  Turns out there’s a ski resort at Winter Park.  I know, I was surprised too.  And this ski resort is the hub of a vast, if scattered, array of condos catering to skiers.  And these skiers like to ski, which is done up at the resort.  Which means they have to get there. Which brings us to the subject of this post: the fleet of shuttle buses known as The Lift.  See what they did there?  It’s a play on the concept of ski lifts, which is something skiers need to get to the top of the mountain.  Very clever.  Especially since the skiers need the buses to get to the bottom of the mountain.

We first discovered these buses in 1993, the occasion of our very first trip on the erstwhile Ski Train.  Unlike the regular Amtrak trains, the Ski Train disembarked passengers right at the base of the ski mountain.  So who needs the bus, if you’re already at the resort?  We did.  Because, we’re not downhill skiers; we were headed down valley to the (also erstwhile) Idlewild cross-country facility.  Enter the shuttle buses, literally.  The whole Middle Park region is served by these gray-and-blue buses, which are free for the using.  The system has been funded by a consortium of businesses, headed by the resort itself.  From what I can gather, it’s been in place for about 30 years, though the system contracted somewhat in recent years, trimming the routes down to Granby and possibly others.  When we first became acquainted with it, the buses were uniformly of the school-bus variety, sans yellow paint.  As time progressed they added a few different, and more comfortable types, but the International buses have remained.  The one at the top of this post was pictured in December 2004.  More recent photos show that they’ve dispensed with the signage on the sides, but the overall scheme remains essentially the same.

So, back to the model railroad. A prominent feature of my layout is the Winter Park area, including part of the town formerly known as Hideaway Park (now simply Winter Park). Since the buses are such a prominent feature of the area, I thought that I should like to model some to decorate the layout.  Accordingly, since the mid-1990s I have slowly accumulated HO-scale school buses, with the intent of repainting them.  A year or so, I finally got around to it.

DSC_2085
Two models of buses, prior to application of signage so you can see the signboards. Note the ski racks below the signs.

There are a few considerations that must be dealt with before one busts out the airbrush. These include:

  • Source photos. These are remarkably hard to come by, unless you make a trip there and photograph some.  And then, all you’ll get is contemporary views. As it turns out, the best photo I could find is a slide that I took myself (at top, again).  Google images will get you three or four more, and that’s about it.
  • Graphics.  The buses had a sign on each side and a modified version on the front above the windshield, a red stripe, and all the usual safety markings.  You’re not going to find any of this stuff from the usual decal vendors (except the red stripes).
  • Sign Boards to support the signs.  Notice those ribs on the sides of the buses?  Yeah, they cut a piece of sheet metal and bolted it on, so that the signs would be flat.  You need to do that for these buses.
  • Ski racks. On the door side there are racks for stowing skis so people don’t have to wrestle them down the aisle.

Fortunately, a few years ago I discovered the Testors decal system, and am fairly good with Photoshop Elements.  Basically, in the proud tradition of Colorado, I rolled my own.  I created all the “The Lift” graphics, stripes, Emergency Exit and Emergency Door signs, no-right-turn sign, and license plates.  I printed all this on white-back decal paper.  Next time I am doing a sheet of clear decals for something, I’ll do the bus numbers too (4 per bus).

Once I’d cobbled together some ski racks and signboards for my buses, I disassembled the bodies and primed and painted them.  The bodies are medium gray and the roofs are dark blue– my shade of blue is very dark, but I don’t really care that much.  I also masked the grilles and the lights.  Once the paint was dry, I peeled the masking and applied the decals, and voila!  Resort Shuttle buses.

Buses at the Hideaway Park condos
A pair of buses, going in opposite directions, are seen in upper Hideaway Park. The Bluebird bus on the right is pulling out of the parking lot after making a drop-off. Over to the left some residents are viewing a large outdoor nativity.

Of course it’s a little more involved than that, especially since the decals aren’t separated like typical commercial ones and you have to trim them right down to the art, no border allowed.  But I mass-produced three of them so it wasn’t horribly difficult.

The Lift drops off some passengers
Side view of one of the buses, a Bluebird. In the left background, an International passes by.

Incidentally, the numbers on my license plates are accurate for specific buses.  Yeah, I’m that OCD.

Now I have three buses in the motor pool, just about right for the amount of scenery I have to cover, and I’m tickled at how they turned out.

Three Buses
Here’s the three buses I painted and decaled for service around Winter Park.

Incidentally, if you are interested in painting some of these for your own needs and need the decals, drop me a note in the comments and I can help you with that.

actionroadlogobang

Midway to Another Obsession, III

Here in my final installment of my series on building the USS Midway, we will get to the finishing touches of the model.  So far we’ve researched the history of the ship and its various rebuilding phases, and had a go at identifying and installing the important modifications.  This time we put on all the stuff that makes the ship come to life (in 1/800 scale, more or less).

When we last spoke, I was saying how it was time to have a thought about the air wing components before we attach the deck to the hull. But before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s go back and build the ship.  Sounds reasonable? I thought so too.

So you’ve decided on your phase of the ship.  Assemble the hull per instructions, with the following considerations:

  • The flight deck and up, and the hull below the flight deck, can be considered separate sub-assemblies and you can build in either order. Last time I talked a lot about modifications to the island. If you build those first and attach the island to the deck before building the hull, that’s OK– but I would install all the deckside catwalk assemblies first.
  • Omit the outboard rudders. The Midway was built with only two, and always had only two. They were enlarged during one of the later rebuilds, but the number remained the same. File off the mounts for the extra rudders.  (Yeah, I didn’t discover this until it was too late.)
  • If you’re modeling anything post-1977, omit the three 5″ guns.
  • Build platforms for the Sparrow launchers and (post-1985) the Phalanx units. The Sparrow boxes are simply squares of .040 styrene with some notches cut in them to represent the launch tubes; the Phalanxes were carved from bits of sprue to shape.
  • Don’t install the deck-edge radio antennas.  See comments below.
  • Refer back to my instructions for installing the hangar deck.

Once the hull is done, see my remarks about paint colors. Those apply to everything above the waterline.  Paint that area first.  Everything below it is an anti-fouling red, with a black waterline stripe. Here my model railroading materials came in handy. Southern Pacific Scarlet is a pretty good shade for the red.  I masked at the waterline and sprayed the red. Once it was good and dry I applied some fat black railroad stripes along the waterline, then overcoated everything with a semi-gloss clear spray.


Now, onward to the air group research!  Thanks to the interwebs, I came across a website that has that exact information.  Since I have chosen to model the ship as she appeared in Desert Storm, I had a look at the page and came up with the following squadron list for the ship:

  • VFA-151 Vigilantes (F/A-18A)
  • VFA-195 Dambusters  (F/A-18A)
  • VFA-192 Golden Dragons (F/A-18A)
  • VA-185 Nighthawks (A-6E)
  • VA-115 Eagles  (A-6E)
  • VAW-115 Liberty Bells (E-2C)
  • VAQ-136 Gauntlets (EA-6B)
  • HS-12 Wyverns (SH-3H)

To distill that down for you, for 1991 you need the following aircraft types:  F/A-18, A-6E, EA-6B, E-2C, and SH-3H.  Fortunately, the stock sprue with the kit includes all of these.  Unfortunately, it doesn’t have nearly enough.  Fortunately, I had some leftover F/A-18s from helping my friend model the Kitty Hawk, so I managed a convincing-enough deckload of aircraft for my purposes.  Feel free to source these from other places– in fact, one can buy aftermarket planes (such as the 1/700 ones by Trumpeter) that are of much better detail than the ones included in the kit.  I didn’t bother.  Incidentally, refer to the prior discussion about the fuzzy scale of this ship– I think the 1/700 planes would look just fine here.

Now, a word about the Navy’s aircraft tactical paint standards.  As it turns out, 1991 was a transitional period.  A new, darker gray tactical protocol had been in  place for a couple of years, but if you look at photos of 1991 not all aircraft had been repainted.  I decided to mix the schemes in my air group.  I can’t tell you which squadrons were still in the old paint, so I just arbitrarily picked some for each scheme.  The leftover F/A-18’s from the Kitty Hawk were already in light gray anyway, so I simply painted the ones that came in my kit into the darker tactical scheme.  My A-6’s are about a half-and-half mix; the EA-6’s all got the dark tactical scheme.

The next thing to consider is that each squadron is allowed one “show bird”, typically flown by the Squadron commander or the CAG, with a flashy colorful paint scheme (the rest of the birds in the squadron will have a shades-of-gray rendering of the design).  Now, painting a show bird in 1/800 is a challenging exercise!  I decided to do the CO’s plane for the VFA-195 Dambusters (F/A-18A, green/yellow), the VFA-192 Golden Dragons (F/A-18A navy/yellow), and the VAW-115 Liberty Bells (E-2C).  I also painted the two SH-3H choppers differently: one in the 1980’s light gray and the other in the later tactical gray.  Now, finding what these “show bird” schemes looked like in 1991 is challenging, but I made my best guess again on this.

And finally: carrier aircraft have folding wings in nearly all cases; definitely all cases for my timeframe. But the tiny little planes provided in the kit do NOT have folded wings.  Considering that wings are nearly always folded except when in the take-off cycle or when landing, this means that the modeler gets to spend a lot of effort chopping and re-attaching tiny little wings onto tiny little aircraft.  Rather than get specific, I’ll merely counsel you to do your photographic research on where to cut them and how to install them properly.  And if you believe that you’re a real badass modeler, fold the rotors on the choppers, correctly.  It took me one try…

USS Midway Deck Activity
The busy deck of a carrier must be run like a well-oiled machine. In this shot, we see the Golden Dragons’ CO ship being directed towards the catapult. Other planes are moving into position under the watchful eyes of aircraft directors. To the right, the catapult crew are stepping away as the Dambusters’ CO readies to shoot.

OK.  Now that you’ve decided your era and sorted out the appropriate aircraft, process a couple of them by folding their wings and painting them, and cement them to the hangar deck just inside the elevator door.  I put a drop of gel superglue on each landing gear and then position them.  I really don’t recommend using the MEK for this; too much can go wrong.  For one thing, if it comes loose inside the ship, then what do you do?


OK, let’s assume that the modified island has been installed, along with the crane and all the superstructures; you’ve attached the deck; you’ve mounted the Sparrows and Phalanxes; you’ve installed all the other hull details in the instructions; you’ve cemented the deck onto the hull.  Now is a good time to do the rotable deck-edge antennae.  Last time I suggested waiting till later to install them, recall?  OK, now is the time.  But do this: trim off all the antennas from the mounts, and throw them far away.  Keep one for reference.  After seeing how chunky the stock antennas looked in my test photos, I replaced them with styrene .022 X .022″ posts. Even this is a little heavy, but the styrene attaches more securely than using steel wire so I chose to go that way.  For the double antennas, cut a small rectangle of .010 sheet and cement the posts to that, then install the mounting tab under the catwalks, then cement the antenna assembly to the tab at an angle parallel to the horizon.  Consult photos. Paint these light-medium gray.

USS Midway
USS Midway, bow view. Note the folded antennae.

Oh, a funny thing about the Midway’s paint. As she appeared in 1991, her deck was a typical dark gray shade (mine is too light, but oh well); her hull was actually a lighter shade than most other carriers in the fleet, and her island was actually a darker shade of gray than most other ships. I ended up using Model Master Medium Gray for the island, and mixing my own lighter shade for the hull.  Also notice how the front end of the island is painted black, as is the port side below the catwalks, and all superstructure above the level of the stacks.

USS Midway, stern
USS Midway, stern view. Note the landing signal array and the supporting hanging gallery.

There’s one detail that I initially was going to omit, mostly because of the work involved, and that is the little gallery under the flight deck astern.  The vertical optical landing assist array (not sure the exact nomenclature here, but it’s the 2-piece orange assembly that hangs down behind the landing deck centerline) is attached to this.  But after I had basically completed the ship, the omission kept bugging me and I finally caved in.  It’s basically a square box that hangs down, with equal openings on each side.  A catwalk connects to the fantail, supported by a couple of struts.  Refer to the photos.  I installed that, then fabricated some strips with bumps on them, and installed all of that.  The gallery gets the light hull color, and the strips a yellow/orange shade.

Blast Deflector
Scratch-built blast deflector behind the port catapult.

Another detail I really wanted was the jet blast deflector(s).  To model one I cut a piece of .010 styrene in a suitable rectangle, figured out where it should be mounted (note: do NOT trust the markings on the Arii model’s deck), and cut four tiny pieces of .022 square strip to support it at the right angle.  Consult real photos, and mine here, to get the idea.  Since I was modeling a launch cycle with part of the foredeck cluttered with aircraft, only the port-side catapult is in use and I could get away with making just one. Incidentally, on the real ships the deflector drops into a recess on the deck, but I wasn’t going to carve that out.  Instead I just painted a lighter rectangle to represent the recess.

Elevator No. 2 Detail
View from starboard aft, showing Elevator No. 2 and adjacent details. Note the placement of the mobile crane and the tractors behind it. Also note the aircraft on the hangar deck, visible below.

Don’t forget about the mobile crane and the two donkeys. The real ship had a swarm of these low plane-handling tractors, but the kit only includes two. Paint them in the same safety yellow shade as the landing array– I used Accuflex D&RGW Yellow, a railroad color that’s basically School Bus Yellow.

Also- let’s chat about the decals. The Arii kit has raised marks that correspond with the decals (for the most part). There are a couple of things to note, before you apply them.

  • The landing deck center stripe was far too orange on my decal sheet– it should be closer to yellow. However, I just gritted my teeth and used it anyway.
  • Post-1986 the Navy omitted that long arrowed line that starts across from the island and goes to the bow. This is a guideline for Harrier jets. The deck has it molded in; again, grit your teeth, or sand it off before painting.
  • The “foul lines” on the forward deck are molded on but no decals are provided.  I used a fine brush and some white calligraphy ink to spot in each stripe for these lines.  Painstaking but not as hard as it sounds.
  • The large “41” deck numerals are the wrong style for my period. Correct ones are available from aftermarket vendors. I just gritted my teeth.  The molded ones on the deck are not a perfect match, either.
  • The raised numerals on the sides of the island: whiskey tango foxtrot?!?  I’m wearing my teeth down to stumps now.

I use Microscale Micro-Sol to set the decals into place.  This dissolves most of the film leaving the graphics behind.  Just be really careful and don’t touch these while processing; they look dry when they are NOT.

After all of your decals are in place, overspray the deck and island with matte or flat finish. Mine’s a little too shiny but I’ll just pretend it’s raining…


At this stage of construction, the ship itself is essentially complete. Now it’s time to bring it to life.  We do this with the aircraft, and– yes– with people.  Tiny, tiny little people.

Having decided on our era, and having identified the composition of the air group, it’s time to decide what they are doing right now.  This gives you a lot of latitude.  For instance, the ship could be just cruising right now, with planes stowed all over the deck. Or it could be running limited patrols.  Or it could be in port (go back and cut off all those horizontal antennas and mount them vertically!).  Or it could be in a launch cycle.  Or a landing cycle.  Or the second or third launch cycle of a major raid.  Or the second or third landing cycle.  Each situation can be depicted by how the planes are spotted, and by what the deck crew are doing.

(I’m assuming that, like me, you will permanently mount your planes so that they don’t get lost or anything.  If not, ignore the bits about glue that follow.)

Overhead view
USS Midway, view of a launch cycle just underway.

Since my era is Desert Storm, I decided to set things up during a launch cycle, probably a second or third one, where a followup strike is being sent into Iraq. Some of the planes landed from earlier strikes have been stashed forward, so only the port catapult is available right now.  An A-6 is being fueled near the No. 3 elevator, and another is being armed across the deck from it.  One of the choppers is preparing to take off for plane guard duty.  The Dambuster CO is on the catapult, engines at full military power, while other aircraft queue up to launch. A pair of E2-C’s and a second chopper are parked by the island.

Jet Fuelers
Aircraft fuel crew in action. Purple shirts are the oilers, and the safety observer is in white.

What brings this scene to life is the presence of the appropriately-colored and appropriately-sized crewmembers around the deck.  These I discovered online, and just had to have them.  They’re made by Eduard, a Czech company, and are 1/800 scale etched metal. Each one is painted in one of the correct deck uniforms for a modern US carrier.  I paid about $13, which seems a lot, but there are plenty of pieces provided to outfit several ships.  I mounted around 45 of them and there are many more remaining.

Port View
Center of ship from portside. The island details show up well here, as well as the crowded deck action. Note the starboard comms tower just forward of the No. 1 elevator. This I scratchbuilt.

A note about painting the aircraft: these were all done by hand. Some were airbrushed while on the sprue for the overall color, but I had to hand-paint the canopies (navy blue) and any other details that required it, especially on the show birds. Note the EA-6B above in the center– I tried very hard to get the multiple windows right.  Given the tiny size, the shakiness of 56-year-old hands, and the magnification involved, I thought they turned out pretty well.  Same thing on the crane and the tractors.  Aircraft national emblem decals came with the kit and they are helpful, but not very accurate for the later tactical schemes since they are too prominent. I used them anyway.

To attach planes and people, I use gel superglue, applied sparingly to the the contact points (the landing gear for the planes, the legs for the crew).  I had to use high-powered magnifiers to do the crew successfully, as well as a fine set of tweezers.  I also had to be super careful to not knock down previously-added crewmembers when putting on more tiny little dudes. Occasionally I had to prop them up while the glue set.  Even with that I had a couple of instances of “man overboard” (yet another reason I was glad the Eduard set had many extras).

USS Midway
Aerial view from port. The finished ship, showing off her unique lines and her ability to project power from the sea and air in the defense of freedom.

And there you have it.  The project that kept growing and growing has been finalized at last.  Enormously satisfying, after four years of wanting to reach this point.

Done.  Right?  Well, what’s a carrier without its battle group?  Destroyers and cruisers and frigates and even subs…

Stay tuned as I build the cruiser USS Bunker Hill in 1/700-ish!   actionroadlogobang

Backdrop Painting 101

How many of us just nail up a piece of hardboard and start slinging paint at it?

Most model railroads do not exist on an infinite plane.  Rather, and especially with modern layout design philosophies, they represent something closer to a series of dioramas placed end-to-end.  Personally, I fell in love with the diorama concept as an impressionable lad on visits to places such as the Denver Museum of Natural History, or the visitor centers at Mesa Verde and Dinosaur National Monument.  The Denver museum’s dioramas tend(ed) to be rather larger in scale, but the concept is the same: a foreground consisting of a three-dimensional recreation of the subject, and a two-dimensional backdrop painting to convey the illusion of depth.

Depth is what we’re after, here.  Whether you’re building a display for a naval vessel, a B-17G, an Astin Martin, or a model railroad, the backdrop is key to making the eye believe that the exhibit exists in a larger world than it actually does.  Accordingly, it behooveth the one who modeleth to acquire certain skills that pertaineth to creation of said backdrops.  And that is our purpose in this series: to learn how to create convincing backdrops behind our model scenes that enhance (not detract from) them.

In this installment we’ll start at the beginning of a backdrop project.  Next time we’ll have a look at the application of these concepts to a specific situation.  You non-train people, bear with me and just substitute language applicable to your discipline in place of all the railroad-related items.  The principles are the same.


As always, I start with certain assumptions.  First, I assume that you are not a professional artist of some kind.  I assume this because, if you are such, you will probably tear me to shreds, and frankly I’m not sure I can bear that.  So, for our purposes you agree to at least pretend that you are not already an expert artist.  Good enough?  Good.  Second, I assume that you are capable of holding a paint brush or at least a pencil.  Third assumption is that you have some idea where your railroad exists in the world– even if your world is imaginary.

Now, for the steps.  Planning is key, not to state the obvious.  But how many of us just nail up a piece of hardboard and start slinging paint at it?  Before you go any further, the first step is to put down that there paintbrush, pardner!  Set back a spell and listen to a tale from a man called Jim…

First thing you need to do is to stop, think, and visualize your scene.  You’ve built some benchwork, laid and electrified your track, maybe even crafted some landforms.  This tells me that you’ve decided on a location for the scene.  It’s on the plains.  Or it’s in the desert.  Or it’s at milepost 23.6 on the Moffat Line.  Wherever it is, you have defined where the scene exists.

Now that the scene has been located in space, you need to locate it in TIME.  This may or may not be obvious to you, so let me elaborate.  Take a moment and look out your window.  Now, what time is it?  Where’s the sun?  It’s causing objects to cast shadows.  Where do they fall?  How long are they?  What’s the sky look like today, and how’s the weather?  What time of year is it?  Now, step away from the window, picture your scene, and write down its time-based attributes.

Sadly, or perhaps fortunately, the weather doesn’t change much on most model railroads.  On mine it’s always winter, so I designed my scenes to reflect typical December-to-February conditions.  Your choice will have a lot to do with how you proceed with your scenicking, not just how the backdrop will appear.

Once you select a time of year, I’d strongly urge you to gather a selection of photographs taken around that same time.  Even if you’re not reproducing a real scene, find or take some photos of something similar, for the rules of light and shadow are the same regardless.  If you are building a real scene, it is even more imperative that you do this.  Obvious?  Probably, but there are practical reasons for this.  More on this later.

Next, you must build the physical structure of the backdrop.  There are a few choices you can make, so let me discuss my efforts for a moment.  I have built basically three scenes on my layout requiring backdrops.  Two are corner scenes and have curved backdrops; one of these was later extended so I had to add on about 16 feet of additional scenery.  Options are driven by requirements; the curved sections were built using Masonite (hardboard); the extension of the Moffat Tunnel “diorama” was built using foam-core board, and after my sad experience with that, I went back to Masonite for the Front Range section.  For that part I also chose to try jigsawing the horizon and placing skyboards behind it.

So, what are the requirements that drive your options?  I’ll enumerate a few; you can probably think of even more that apply to your situation.

  • Distance from the average viewer, and height of that viewer’s eyes.  This influences the height of the backdrop (i.e. if it’s set back 36″ from the edge of the layout, you may need to make it fairly tall).
  • Support options.  Will it attach to a wall, or must it be free-standing?
  • Shape: flat, or curved?
  • Budget: how much do you want to spend?
  • Domestic: are you able to hammer, saw, screw to walls, and otherwise disturb your household and/or neighbors?  If you live in an apartment, your landlord may have something to say here.
  • Width of scene.  If it’s less than the width of available materials, you might choose a pre-cut material such as foam core rather than a more elegant lumberyard solution.  (Joining backdrop sections can be challenging.)

Back to my experiences.  First of all, using Masonite for the curved backdrops was entirely satisfactory.  Just be sure you have adequate framing to secure it.  It also proved to be good for the long Front Range backdrop– I cut the top edge, you may recall, and that gives my mountains a hint of three-dimensionality that is sometimes hard to get from a flat painted surface.  Masonite is durable and flexible.  Just be aware that it can get rather heavy in large pieces, and can chip or separate with handling if you’re too rough.  Foam core, on the other hand, seemed a perfect solution for a huge section that was wall-mounted.  That is, it was perfect until I airbrushed it with diluted Acrylic paint for the base colors.  The next day when I inspected the dried paint, I found that the moisture had caused the boards to curl over!  It’s like un-ringing a bell; it can’t be undone.  Well, almost can’t be done.  It turned out I had some pieces of 1/2″ trim in my spares pile, and nailed these along the upper edge of the warped foam-core boards to bring them back into a semblance of flatness.  Misting the boards with water helped them relax a bit.  Moral of that story: don’t get foam-core very wet, and I strongly recommend that you secure all edges of it until your paint is good and dry.

Okay, now that you’ve decided on a material, cut it and attach it to the backside of your benchwork.  As mentioned, curved pieces must be securely attached.  However, remember what I said about requirements and options?  My Front Range section actually goes down the middle of my garage, and I thought it wise to make it removable.  So, I built some slots on the back of the scene and slid the backdrop down into them.  This is easy since I can walk right up to the back, but there’s an unexpected implication of this: when building your foreground scenery, you cannot attach to the backdrop.  Plastered hills cannot “lean” on the board, although if you’re good you can shape them to touch it when everything’s installed.  Did I mention that I’m good?   🙂

I did say that we’d do a project in the next installment, so I will try not to get ahead of myself too far here, but there are a few general things you’ll do anyway.  The first of these is to prime the surface.  I’d use a white latex wall primer.  This way your colors will work when you get to that step, and you’ll also be able to see your sketch lines.  Next, referring to your photos or sketch, draw the outlines of major landforms or skyline features such as tall buildings.  Anything that’s a major terrain feature should be sketched, but the most important one is the horizon.

And this brings me to a discussion on point-of-view and how that influences your backdrop.  Any good painting essentially displays the subject from a particular spot, or point of view, and all the picture’s perspective supports that.  (Unless you’re trying to screw with the viewer like in some Escher drawings!)  But a backdrop on a railroad can be seen from any of a number of vantages, and this is a real disadvantage, so to speak.  Here’s the problem.  Let’s say you have a structure like a ski lodge or a row of storefronts.  The facades do not present much of a problem, as they are probably parallel to the surface of your backdrop.  But what about the side walls?  The roof?  Draw it so that it looks right from one angle, and it will look wrong from another!  Go back and look at the header image of this article.  The tops of the ski lodge buildings are painted to look right if one is a certain height– like mine– and if I’m standing so that the physical structure to the right is presented at the same evident angle.  But if a small child views it from below, then he cannot see the top of the blue building whereas the tops of the brown building stick up awkwardly.  It detracts from the realism, and there is no perfect solution for this.

If you’re interested in my opinions, here they are.  First, do your best to find what you think is the most common viewing angle, and design the perspective from there.  Second, if there’s a way to make the painted structure tall enough that the roof can’t be seen from any angle, so much the better.  Third, if at all possible, place such structures as far into the distance as possible; this reduces distortion of the perspective.  If that’s not possible, I would suggest that you cut the facades from foam core and fix that to the backdrop, giving a hint of three dimensions, and not show any side or top surfaces.  I’ve done this with the pillars on my model of Union Station and it is surprisingly convincing.  But just realize that no backdrop can perfectly represent three dimensions in two, as viewed from every angle.  This is my strongest argument against using enlarged photo montages for backdrops.

Okay, so now we have the primed backdrop installed on the layout.  Now it’s time to have another discussion on what you will paint, before you paint it.  This discussion can be summarized as:  Light is Everything!  Everything.  Absolutely… everything.  Remember talking about the time of day and year and stuff like that, up above?  Now it’s time to get really really specific.  You must decide where the sun is, at this moment.  That will dictate which sides of objects are highlighted and shadowed.  It dictates where shadows fall on the ground (yes, you will paint those!)  It decides how bright, and how sharp, your scene is.  It also influences how you place your layout’s floodlighting, which is a subject for possibly another post.  The only way to avoid this decision process is to decide that it’s night.  So, go get a bucket of black paint and use it on the backdrop.  You’re done.  Wasn’t that easy?

Oh wait.  It’s daylight.  Dang it.

So, did you ever wonder why sundials aren’t perfect tellers of time all year long?  Or why that one scene in National Treasure, where they find Benjamin Franklin’s glasses behind a brick at Independence Hall, just doesn’t work in the real world?  Because of that whole the-axis-of-the-Earth-is-tilted phenomenon.  In other words, the Sun is not at the same angle at 9:00 AM in January as it is at the same time on June 20th.  Not even close.  And this is why you must decide on a season, preferably a month, and a time of day, for your scene.  A funny characteristic of light beams: at our distance from the sun they are effectively parallel.  This means that all shadows hit the ground at the same angle. This is actually a good thing, because you can make a template to help you judge this.  Easiest thing in the world, so long as you know how high in the sky the Sun is, and what angle relative to your backdrop it is.  Do a little three-dimensional geometry (see previous post on the usefulness of geometry) and cut out a right triangle with hypotenuse cut at the sun’s angle).  Use that when you start painting shadows and such.

Oh, and one other thing.  Which direction is north in your scene?  All else hangs on that.  (South, if you’re in the southern hemisphere…)

I made a few references to perspective above.  In case you never had Art Class in 7th grade, I’d suggest that you google up the concept of perspective and get more familiar.  As it turns out, there are two very different types of perspective that we will utilize in our scenes.  One is what I will call the vanishing-point concept, and the other is that of distance perspective.  So, the vanishing point refers to a place in the far distance where all lines parallel to our line of sight converge.  It’s Infinity, kind of a visual black hole.  Turns out that drawing objects is a little more complicated than that– there may be two or more such points arranged along a horizontal line, for example– but it will help you get things closer to real appearance.  Look at any photo and you will observe this.  See the header photo above and study the brown lodge for a moment.  I purposely shot the photo standing in a location where the perspective was most convincing.

The second concept, distance perspective, is simply the recognition that the further things are away from you, the more air there is between you and it.  Air is not clear.  Big surprise, huh.  Being about 78% nitrogen, it’s actually quite blue, and sometimes contains other particulates or vapor that make it even more murky.  That’s why distant ridges covered with green trees actually look blue, or gray, or black.  Your distant palette will be in faded blues and grays.  Nearby forests and objects will be much closer to true color, so for those you would break out the ocher and reds and greens.  Again, see the header photo and you can see how I utilized this concept.

Now, go back to the scene you’re building.  Study your photos if you have them, and decide on the depth of the scene.  How distant is the horizon?  How close are objects in the picture?  A deep but distant scene will have relatively flat perspective. A close scene will have noticeably different object sizes from foreground to background.  You will use the vanishing-point technique to get the sizes and positions right.

So that was a rather lengthy introduction to the subject.  Next time we’ll bust out the paint and brushes, and make a mess.  Stay tuned.  actionroadlogobang

Track Geometry, or Two Parallel Lines

What they don’t teach you in geometry class is that low-grade 5/16″ plywood has a mind of its own, especially if it has ever gotten wet.

Navajo Mine Railway Track
Jointed rail on the Navajo Mine Railway

Of all the math courses I took in junior high and high school, the one in which I actually got decent grades was geometry.  I suspect it’s because the subject made sense.  It wasn’t dealing in the abstract but instead it had immediate real-world applications.  (Apologies to all the math teachers out there; I get it that you have to be able to crunch the numbers before you can apply them.)  In fact, that geometry class may have been my favorite one at Fairview High, despite the teach’s terrible 1970’s comb-over.  I mean, really.  When you can see shiny scalp between the bryl-creamed strands of hair, who exactly do you think you’re fooling?

But I digress.  Geometry, and especially trigonometry, have proven more useful in my world than almost any other subject I learned in school.  Yeah, I got mediocre grades in English!  A person can use trigonometry to build stuff.  That and an understanding of the concept of pi are sufficient tools to design things like, say, a model railroad.  Well, that and a few carpentry skills, which I picked up from my dad and my other favorite class, wood shop.  (Why not two favorites?  Why choose between pizza and a hot fudge sundae?  Gimme both, say I!)

What they don’t teach you in geometry class is that low-grade 5/16″ plywood has a mind of its own, especially if it has ever gotten wet.

So let’s fast-forward about 21 years after my graduation from high school. One week the family was out of town, so I used the evenings to throw together some benchwork for a layout expansion in the spare room. My design called for using the conventional cookie-cutter method to create the subroadbed.  I visited Hacienda, came home with all the requisite materials **, and stockpiled them on the back porch for the following day when I would start cutting.  Unfortunately the next day it rained while I was at work. Not to worry, I said to myself; the wood will behave if I use sufficient supporting risers between the subroadbed and the supporting 1X4 framework. I should have worried.

(** Why use such thin plywood for decking?  Because, in turning a helix, it enabled me to reduce the grade just a smidge since the structure above the lower levels was a bit thinner.)

Turns out, my materials had acquired some new un-flatness, and I was never really able to completely train it out of the wood. Plus, thin plywood doesn’t warp consistently in every direction anyway; it actually does have a bit of a grain.  And here’s the thing: laying tight-radius track on a grade with reverse curves is a recipe for disaster anyway. Throw in a few unplanned humps and dips and you will never reliably keep a train together. It’s like installing multiple yard humps out on the mainline; those Kadees just slide apart. (Hm, a model hump yard with scale retarders?  Who wants to give that a shot in 1:87?  I can tell you, the hump part will work just fine!)

Okay, now move forward another decade. We’ve moved to a new house and I’m rebuilding the railroad in a larger space, using many of the components from the prior installation. This, of course, means that I’ve incorporated the same warped roadbed in the construction. Truth is, I never operated the former version enough to realize how bad the track geometry problems were. Now, however, I have a much longer, fully ballasted mainline and I’m operating longer trains with (this is significant) a lot of 86′ cars. Turns out, cars less than 50′ are Labrador retrievers, pretty forgiving of squirrelly operating conditions. An 86′ flatcar, on the other hand, is a rich sorority girl; it wants to be treated like a little princess or it uncouples, or goes off the rails. I had a whole yard full of prima donnas.  So, what to do? Go our separate ways, or fix the relationship?

This is where it’s useful to ponder the seemingly-obvious fact that we’re modeling actual railroads, only smaller. Real railroads face similar challenges, although they’re usually smart enough not to install a 40-degree curve on a mainline! No, they have track geometry problems of their own. Take a look at the header photo, which I snapped of the track at my former employer.  What solutions do real railroads bring to the problem?  Well, two immediately come to mind.  One is to contract a rail grinder company to visit and to smooth out the railheads.  Another is to get the section gangs or other contractors to level the roadbed, lifting track when necessary, and get everything more-or-less on the same plane.  It turns out that the first solution is tough to employ on a widespread basis in scale applications, whereas the second holds far more promise. And that’s where I am going to spend the rest of our time today: how to level out your track by lifting and re-ballasting.

Okay, first a couple of assumptions. First, I use flextrack, basic old Atlas Code 100 in my case, but any flextrack will do for this. You must be using some kind of flex track or scale “panel” track; hand-spiked track is beyond our scope.  Second, I’m ballasting my track and so must you. The type of ballast is up to you. On my railroad I go mostly for a darker shade to represent the D&RGW’s slag and scoria that they used for years. It’s a blend of 50% commercial black ballast and 50% coarse sand.  In other words, sand that’s roughly the same size as the commercial ballast. Third, I’m using mostly cork roadbed, because it’s easy, firm, and has a good profile. It’s also possible to use craft foam cut into strips; I actually use large sheets of this to underlay my yard trackage, but use multiple strips to elevate mainline bypass tracks around the yards.

Other tools and materials?

  • A short straight-edge, such as a small level, between 8″ and 12″ in length.
  • A tack hammer.
  • A nail set.
  • An inexpensive chisel.
  • A medium-soft paint brush
  • Track spikes, something a little longer than normal since we are lifting the track higher than normal.
  • A bottle of white glue such as Elmer’s (don’t go with the cheap dollar-store stuff!!!).
  • A squeeze bottle for diluting the glue, such as your previous Elmer’s bottle.
  • A spray bottle, such as you might use for plants or laundry or training the cats. Just be sure you tell your wife that you’ve borrowed hers. A better solution is to purchase your own dang bottle…

Now that you have all that stuff in a pile, let’s examine your track. First of all, you probably already have some idea where the problems live, but I’d suggest the following: assemble a short train of long cars, such as piggyback flats. These are best because there is little in the way above the deck line and you can most easily observe the action of the couplers. Now, run the train slowly around the railroad, walking with it and observing any bobbing of the ends of the cars. See if there are places where one car’s coupler lifts away from the adjoining car. Sometimes it’s obvious and other times it may take a few runs. Once you identify the spot, mark it somehow.  You’ve found a high spot, which means that on one side or the other is a sag.  The sags are what we must locate, and this is where the straight-edge (your short level) comes into play.  I use a level not because of its leveling features, but because it’s thicker than a ruler. This aids you in the process.

Place the level atop the railheads at the high point, and move it each way, eyeballing it from the side. You should be able to see where the track dips away from the straight-edge.  Go out some distance in each direction from the high point. This can be tricky if it’s on a curve and even more so on a curving grade, as there’s a helical shape introduced into the track now. More on this later.

So, now you’ve found a sag.  This is important since it’s far simpler to lift a sag than to undercut a high spot.  We will focus on dealing with the sag.

Assuming that your track’s been nailed down already, here’s what you do.  Take the chisel and whack chunks out of the plywood.

No.  No.  I’m only kidding!  That is not what you do.

(Take 2) Locate any track nails in the area, take the chisel, rest it on the railhead, and use its sharp edge to gently lift the nails up from the sub-roadbed. Yes– we are using the chisel as a crowbar. Once you have loosened all nails in your sag, gently loosen the track from the ballast.  I’m assuming here that you had glued the ballast when first installed. Sure, you could just demolish the first ballast installation, but that’s really not necessary.

— And here’s where I am going to take a giant step backwards and pretend that I was smarter back when I first installed the ballast. Here’s the secret: you can do all of this before you put the ballast in the first time! Saves much time. If you haven’t yet ballasted the track, simply adjust this process.  You’re smart and I’m confident that you can manage it.

OK, back on track, so to speak.  Now that you have your sag loosened, you want to try to get the railheads as level as possible, longitudinally and laterally. (Also, it’s kinda important that you don’t work on too much track at a time, lest it drift off alignment.)  Okay so far?  Now you have a loosened piece of track hovering above the roadbed. Take a Dixie cup full of your preferred ballast, and gently sprinkle it down the center of the track  Not much, mind you.  Just enough to work between the ties and get under the track. Work this in with the brush, tamp by gently tapping on the track, and re-check things with the straight edge. Wash, rinse, and repeat as necessary until the track has been leveled across the sag (without creating a new hump. That would be defeating the purpose, you see). Once it’s to the desired grade, ballast outside the rails, being sure to fill any voids caused by lifting the track.

Now, we fix it all in place.  Mix some glue about 50:50 with water in the small squeeze bottle.  Gently spray the track with the spray bottle to moisten things.  Using your squeeze bottle, flow the glue mixture into the ballast, thoroughly saturating it.  Be sure you saturate it all!  Now, go away and do something else for a day or so.

After the ballast has hardened, gently push the track nails back into place.  If you didn’t move anything, they should find their former holes and go right in.  You really don’t want to pound on anything at this point, but you can use the tack hammer and nail set to seat any stubborn nails if absolutely necessary.  But remember: be gentle! And accurate too, let’s not forget about that. The nails are not really holding the track down now; that’s being done by the ballast and the glue.

Polish the railheads to remove any extraneous glue or haze, inspect for any stray chunks of ballast that might interfere with a flange, and send the test train back over the spot.  You should notice a marked improvement.  Chances are, there will be other sags and humps, sometimes revealed by fixing one like this.  I had to lift an entire section of track, two or three feet long, to deal with a serious dip. Just fix whatever you must, until your trains stay on the rails better.

The result: You will be so glad you leveled your track. It makes such a difference. actionroadlogobang

A comment on superelevation. This, for those who may not be familiar, is simply the technique of banking railroad track on curves, much as in Nascar or at Indy, right? It seems like a really good idea, so I tried it on my railroad.  Um, it was a disaster. Here’s why: I’m dealing with pretty tight radii, down to 24″ r at times. I know, I know, curves that sharp look terribly unrealistic, but space constraints are a reality.  Well, if you think about superelevation, you are essentially laying track around a bowl. If you have long cars such as 85′ passenger cars, auto racks, or pig flats, what happens is that the trucks lean up so that the outboard axles are pushed higher. Combined with the fact that the trucks are already turned to the side, the outer ends of the trucks will probably hang up on the underside of your car and derail. If you superelevate a curve on a grade, it’s even worse–it’s like climbing a corkscrew.  I ended up abandoning the effort, removing all shims from my track and reverting to level track. In some ways it would almost be better to lean it out than in, at my curvatures! Sub-elevation?  Hm.  But no, I draw the line at some things.  I would not recommend superelevating any curves at less than about 48″ radius in HO scale, proportionally adjusted for other scales.